The Three Stooges Online Filmography
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Average Rating:     [7.44/10]   8 votes
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HOLLYWOOD PARTY

Jimmy Durante's "Schnarzan" movies are losing popularity to a competing studio's "Liondora" (George Givot) series. Hearing that the famous Baron Munchausen is coming to town, complete with lions captured in an African safari, Durante throws a huge Hollywood party in the Baron's honor, hoping to buy the lions for his films. Ted and the Stooges appear as photographers hoping to get photos and autographs of the celebrities attending the party, with a funny scene where three professors argue over the Stooges' proper place in the evolutionary ladder.



HOLLYWOOD PARTY had a troubled production that took 7 months (August 1933 - March 1934), involving reshoots, several Assistant Directors, re-edits, etc. Healy & The Stooges filmed their scene sometime during August - October 1933 (exact date unknown).

In spite of the rivalry between MGM and Disney, Walt Disney accepted Louis B. Mayer's request to supply the film's Technicolor animated sequence "The Chocolate Soldiers," with an introduction by Mickey Mouse voiced by Walt Disney.

Laurel and Hardy costar as the Baron's lion deliverymen; they engage in a hilarious tit-for-tat routine with Lupe Velez.

The Stooges' scene, as well as scenes with Durante and Laurel & Hardy, were reused in the MGM compilation feature MGM'S THE BIG PARADE OF COMEDY (1964).

View the original theatrical trailer at TCM.com

IMDb Rating

HOLLYWOOD PARTY on IMDb

Featuring
Ted Healy and His Stooges
Release Date
May 24, 1934
Studio
MGM
Production Type
Feature Film
Duration
68.5 min.
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Production Notes   (3)
Working Title(s):   Hollywood Revue of 1933, Star Spangled Banquet
Prod. No.:   695
Shooting Days:   0 days   From: 1933-08-14   To: 1934-03-16

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Fan Reviews   (5)
Re: HOLLYWOOD PARTY
Posted 2010-07-15 11:51:50 by Final Shemp
What it lacks in plot it makes up for in entertainment, Hollywood Party is a lot of fun to watch even if I doubt I'll remember it tomorrow morning.
The film plays out almost as a sketch comedy, with Jimmy Durante's plot playing the string that hooks random segments of party guests together. The funniest moments go to Jack Pearl, who is reprising his radio personality of Baron Munchausen.
"This is the son of King Kong! His name…is Ping Pong!"
Laurel and Hardy get some strong laughs for their climatic bout with Lupe Velez. Ted Healy and the Stooges have a terrific scene in which a group of professors deduce their place on the evolutionary ladder. Mickey Mouse's cameo is gold, along with The Hot Chocolate Soldiers animated segment that follows.
By the end of its runtime, Hollywood Party runs very tired. It's a little sad, since it's barely an hour long, but it has enough steam to keep its wacky situations going for such a short period.
Final Shemp's Final Word: 2 1/2 Pokes

Reviewer's Rating: (6)
Re: HOLLYWOOD PARTY
Posted 2001-11-24 22:47:00 by Nicole
Edited 2006-03-27 10:04:28 by shemps#1
I didn't enjoy this film. The Stooges barely got a part in it. Plus, when I first saw this, the word that came to mind was, "fluffy," because it doesn't have much of anything to it, only stars of the day showing one-by-one, doing their thing, and getting on with it. Good to be seen for reference, not good for entertainment.
Re: HOLLYWOOD PARTY
Posted 2003-02-18 04:23:00 by Bruckman
A very brief Stooge/Healy appearance, though production stills indicate they may have had a more extended turn at annoying various partygoers (one still, printed in MOE HOWARD AND THE THREE STOOGES, shows them with boxer Max Baer, who's also missing in action from the final print). HOLLYWOOD PARTY, originally planned as THE HOLLYWOOD REVUE OF 1933, was a film with a long and erratic filming history; the fact it wasn't in general release until the Stooges were at Columbia and already at work on their second short there is a clear indication of the delays which beset this movie. One critic wrote that the picture was in production during 2 presidential terms (accurate if you consider that Hoover was still president during pre-production in early '33). Laurel and Hardy show up fairly late in the film w/an extended turn and the film overall manages to sustain a wacky 30s sensibility despite uneven pacing and some overlong musical numbers. Probably more interesting as a cross-section of early 30s popular comedy, ranging from the sight-gags (virtually silent) of L&H to the knockabout of the Stooges to Durante and radio comics like Jack Pearl (Baron Munchausen) and Ben Bard, plus character comedy from Polly Moran and Charles Butterworth and some requisite titillation from Lupe Velez. Plot is negligible (they took 9 months to film and all they could come up with was something about buying lions?), some pretty good camerawork (James Wong Howe), and almost every director under contract to MGM (plus a few like George Stevens who weren't) took a hack at a scene or 2.

Reviewer's Rating: (8)
Re: HOLLYWOOD PARTY
Posted 2002-06-10 18:18:00 by sickdrjoe
Stoogaholics will find this disappointing, but fans of this era of movie history will be fascinated by this one-off curio's curio. I think this was scheduled to be a much bigger & more-ballyhooed production at first. Somewhere along the line, Plan A got abandoned; the truncated half-fish/half-fowl that got released became sorta the first Allan Smithee production (no director is listed). Worth watching just to ogle Lupe Velez in a dress that surely had Johnny Weissmuller doing a full-blooded Tarzan yell later that night.

Reviewer's Rating: (9)
Re: HOLLYWOOD PARTY
Posted 2001-08-30 04:30:00 by [Deleted Member]
Good film. Durante and Laurel & Hardy were show stealers. I can't say enough good things about L&H, but this IS a Stooge site. This is the least favorite of all Stooge performances I've seen, but I still like it. The above mentioned line of Moe's was hilarious. It made me think of Moe's line from "Malice in the Palace", "Hey, spinach-chin!" (talking to another bearded man). The presence of Mickey Mouse and the cartoon they showed was anadda good highlight. I recorded this, but I may be keeping it more for L&H than the Stooges.ISLIPP- dogs YIPP. ©2001Edited by - ISLIPP on 8/30/01 4:39:05 AM

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